7 Comments
Nov 14·edited Nov 14Liked by Eric Topol

Such an uplifitng conversation. I left with tears in my eyes and joy in my heart. These deep and important human messages of hope and joy for human existence are reflected in every word of this wondererful human beings philosophy. Inspiration like nothing else. Thank you Bruce and Eric for sharing. The bonds of human friendship as you both have obviously shared and still share, sustain us all beyond any fear danger or desperation.

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What an amazing conversation. This needs to be shared with all of our colleagues, students and patients.

Thank you very much.

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As a person with AFib this conversation struck home. My family has some kind of genetic propensity for cancer as well. Both my parents, my uncle, my oldest sister- all died from it. My other sister and I survived it. I however am the only one with a heart condition. A question I ask myself but perhaps I should pose to the doctors is this: At what point should an old man who has secured the prosperity of his family simply stop taking the medications and precautions he is given, and simply let Nature take her sweet course? At what point should he sweep the bottles off the shelf and go outside to watch the birds, feel the breeze on one's face? Never go back into the sterile rooms of the hospitals with the pain charts and IV drips we know too well. Such an old man is not choosing death I think, but true life. The sweet course of us all. I am not asking for myself but for all of us. Something to ponder.

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Thank you Dr Topol for posting this moving conversation . I was a cardiology fellow at ccf in the early to mid 90’s and well remember Dr Wilkoff ‘s kindness and patience as he tried to teach me about cardiac devices. Prayers for both of you

Terry Anderson

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I'm from a family with the LMNA gene mutation. It was wonderful to hear this conversation and learn more about the person behind the devices that were recommended for my mother (early 90's), my brother (2001) my sister (2013 done at CC) and now my nephew (2021). I am stunned at the rapidly advancing nature of treatments in cardiology. This LMNA gene mutation is heartbreaking. I lucked out. No mutation. These devices extended the life of my siblings and prevented sudden death, although they're gone now. But my nephew is on top of it and living in Boston helps.

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